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Beware of Ghost Particles in Your Lubricants

John Sander | Vice President of Research & Development, Lubrication Engineers
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WEBINAR DESCRIPTION:

In recent years, maintenance individuals have come to understand the importance of oil cleanliness to reliable machine operation. Accomplishing this requires employment of various tools, such as filtration, desiccation, clean transfer equipment, and proper lubricant selection to create a lubrication reliability program. To evaluate the efficiency of a program, oil analysis is recommended. Particle count testing is an oil analysis tool that involves passing a laser light through a used oil sample as it passes through the machine. A sensor collects and compiles data that quantifies the size and amount of particulate contamination in the sample. Unfortunately, some users have employed all means possible to achieve their lubricant cleanliness goal only to find out that no matter what they do, the oil never cleans. Why would this be the case? Is it possible that the sample contains some sort of “ghost” particles? This presentation will describe particle count testing and the phenomenon described here as ghost particles.

Learning Takeaways

  1. Find out about ghost particles and how to eliminate them.
  2. Learn the answers to these questions:
  • How do particles get into oil?
  • How does a particle counter work and what is the ISO cleanliness code system?
  • What if the oil is NEVER cleaning up? (It’s possible that it is not a failure of the lubrication cleanliness efforts.)

Register for Beware of Ghost Particles in Your Lubricants by John Sander, Lubrication Engineers

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

John Sander, Vice President of Research & Development, Lubrication Engineers, Inc., has a BS in chemistry from Wichita State University and an MS in environmental science from Friends University. In 1989 he began his career at Lubrication Engineers, where he has been responsible for a variety of lubricant quality, formulation and testing activities. He holds CLS and OMA I certifications from STLE, and a CLGS certification from NLGI. His memberships include SAE, NLGI, ACS and STLE. He has authored or co-authored 20+ technical and marketing papers and one book chapter (Chapter 13: “Petroleum Oil Hydraulic Fluids” in the Handbook of Hydraulic Fluid Technology). He is a past winner of the NLGI Author’s Award.

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About the Author

John Sander Vice President of Research & Development, Lubrication Engineers

John Sander, Vice President of Research & Development, Lubrication Engineers, Inc., has aBS in chemistry from Wichita State University and an MS in environmental science from Friends University. In 1989 he began his career at Lubrication Engineers, where he has been responsible for a variety of lubricant quality, formulation and testing activities. He holds CLS and OMA I certifications from STLE, and a CLGS certification from NLGI. His memberships include SAE, NLGI, ACS and STLE. He has authored or co-authored 20+ technical and marketing papers and one book chapter (Chapter 13: “Petroleum Oil Hydraulic Fluids” in the Handbook of Hydraulic Fluid Technology). He is a past winner of the NLGI Author’s Award.